THE DEATH OF FILM

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WHY DON’T YOU PLAY IN HELL?

in life, there is before you see Sion Sono’s WHY DON’T YOU PLAY IN HELL?, and there is after you see Sion Sono’s WHY DON’T YOU PLAY IN HELL? and once you cross that great divide, this fucking jingle for a fake toothpaste will haunt you for the rest of your days. 

Drafthouse Films is going to release the movie in US theaters on Halloween, 2014. expect them to have some fun with this in the process.

REVIEW: “MAKE YOUR MOVE” (2.5 / 5)
An admirably diverse update of West Side Story that’s varnished with all the charm, budget, and formal elegance of Gossip Girl, the irresistibly dopey Make Your Move drops the spectacle endemic to most dance films in favor of a forward-thinking sweetness. While this international coproduction between Robert Cort Productions and Korea’s CJ Entertainment bends over backwards to communicate that it’s Step Up: Bushwick, it moves with the kind of corporate vibe that Brooklyn’s least gentrified hipster hotspot is struggling to resist. What the film lacks in authenticity, however, it makes up for in good intentions and simple pleasures. 

Sensitive where Step Up is sweaty, Make Your Move feels simultaneously regressive and ahead of its time. Written and directed by Duane Adler, a dance-community fixture who used the project to marry the sentiment of his Save The Last Dance script with the carnal “choreography conquers all” attitude that anchored his Step Up script, Make Your Move is a sheep in wolf’s clothing. By cleaving close to the Romeo And Juliet template, the film’s plot introduces a degree of simmering violence that feels foreign to this type of fare, but this most wide-eyed take on star-crossed lovers is probably the first riff on the classic tale that ends with Mercutio and Tybalt shaking hands and saying “We good?”
READ THE FULL REVIEW ON THE DISSOLVE

REVIEW: “MAKE YOUR MOVE” (2.5 / 5)

An admirably diverse update of West Side Story that’s varnished with all the charm, budget, and formal elegance of Gossip Girl, the irresistibly dopey Make Your Move drops the spectacle endemic to most dance films in favor of a forward-thinking sweetness. While this international coproduction between Robert Cort Productions and Korea’s CJ Entertainment bends over backwards to communicate that it’s Step Up: Bushwick, it moves with the kind of corporate vibe that Brooklyn’s least gentrified hipster hotspot is struggling to resist. What the film lacks in authenticity, however, it makes up for in good intentions and simple pleasures. 

Sensitive where Step Up is sweaty, Make Your Move feels simultaneously regressive and ahead of its time. Written and directed by Duane Adler, a dance-community fixture who used the project to marry the sentiment of his Save The Last Dance script with the carnal “choreography conquers all” attitude that anchored his Step Up script, Make Your Move is a sheep in wolf’s clothing. By cleaving close to the Romeo And Juliet template, the film’s plot introduces a degree of simmering violence that feels foreign to this type of fare, but this most wide-eyed take on star-crossed lovers is probably the first riff on the classic tale that ends with Mercutio and Tybalt shaking hands and saying “We good?”

READ THE FULL REVIEW ON THE DISSOLVE

Ghost In The Shell (1995)
The title card that introduces Mamoru Oshii’s Ghost In The Shell is split into two sentences. The first reads like boilerplate pretext for a techno-thriller: “In the near future—corporate networks reach out to the stars, electrons and light flow throughout the universe.” The second is perhaps the most quietly upsetting foreword in film history: “The advance of computerization, however, has not yet wiped out nations and ethnic groups.”

On first blush, it seems reassuring, as nations and ethnic groups are things that people typically prefer not to be eradicated off the face of the earth. But there’s something unnervingly nonchalant about the wording of that opening scrawl. It may not be palpable at first (particularly in the dubbed and graphically retouched version of the film available on Hulu, which doesn’t bother to subtitle the Japanese text), but the bleak implications of the preamble poke through as the film’s resigned worldview begins to take shape. A philosophical treatise masquerading as cybernetic noir, Ghost In The Shell immediately looks beyond human civilization as we’ve known it, and does so with a confidence that steals the story away from the speculative and locates it firmly in the inevitable.
READ THE FULL ARTICLE AT THE A.V. CLUB

Ghost In The Shell (1995)

The title card that introduces Mamoru Oshii’s Ghost In The Shell is split into two sentences. The first reads like boilerplate pretext for a techno-thriller: “In the near future—corporate networks reach out to the stars, electrons and light flow throughout the universe.” The second is perhaps the most quietly upsetting foreword in film history: “The advance of computerization, however, has not yet wiped out nations and ethnic groups.”

On first blush, it seems reassuring, as nations and ethnic groups are things that people typically prefer not to be eradicated off the face of the earth. But there’s something unnervingly nonchalant about the wording of that opening scrawl. It may not be palpable at first (particularly in the dubbed and graphically retouched version of the film available on Hulu, which doesn’t bother to subtitle the Japanese text), but the bleak implications of the preamble poke through as the film’s resigned worldview begins to take shape. A philosophical treatise masquerading as cybernetic noir, Ghost In The Shell immediately looks beyond human civilization as we’ve known it, and does so with a confidence that steals the story away from the speculative and locates it firmly in the inevitable.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE AT THE A.V. CLUB

c-inefilia:

 ”On the set of the film The Mirror, Andrey Tarkovsky included himself in one scene, lying in a hospital bed and holding a tiny bird on his right hand. And this is what happened to him at the end of his life: in his sick-room in Paris, the room where he died, a little bird would fly every morning through the open window and come to light on him.” 
From the book “Instant Light - Tarkovsky Polaroids

c-inefilia:

 ”On the set of the film The Mirror, Andrey Tarkovsky included himself in one scene, lying in a hospital bed and holding a tiny bird on his right hand. And this is what happened to him at the end of his life: in his sick-room in Paris, the room where he died, a little bird would fly every morning through the open window and come to light on him.” 

From the book “Instant Light - Tarkovsky Polaroids

(via iwanttobelikearollingstone)


"I was a woman with a plan. I knew the only thing, that could really stopped me, in my opinion, was to fall in love.
I went in, at lunch, to put my books in the locker and I got to the doorway and … I saw John Cassavetes, and I thought : oh, oh damn! No, no, no. No!
That’s just exactly what I don’t want.”
Gena Rowlands on her first meeting with John Cassavetes 

"I was a woman with a plan. I knew the only thing, that could really stopped me, in my opinion, was to fall in love.

I went in, at lunch, to put my books in the locker and I got to the doorway and … I saw John Cassavetes, and I thought : oh, oh damn! No, no, no. No!

That’s just exactly what I don’t want.”

Gena Rowlands on her first meeting with John Cassavetes 

(via bbook)